View looking south at low tide in Lyme Regis, Dorset, on the Jurassic Coast.

Jurassic Coast Beaches – Posts about Lyme Regis

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Lyme Regis in Dorset on the Jurassic Coast is a beautiful and slightly old-fashioned seaside town with fantastic beaches and fascinating geological history. Even the most casual visitor cannot fail to be impressed by what this small town has to offer (the recently renovated museum, gallery, shops, cafes and restaurants), by the spectacular seafront views, and the wonderful rocks, fossils, and seashore life. I love visiting Lyme Regis, the promenade, the Cobb, Monmouth Beach, Old Church Cliffs, and the Spittles. Here are links to some of the posts that I have written about Lyme over the years. Enjoy.

JURASSIC COAST NATURE – Posts about Lyme Regis

GENERAL

Low tide at Lyme Regis

Lyme 3

Lyme 4

Lyme 7

Lyme 8

The shore below the new sea wall Part 1

The shore below the new sea wall Part 2

The beach below the Spittles

The old sea wall at Church Cliff February 2011

Old sea wall at Church Cliff Part 1

Woodgrain on old Church Cliff breakwaters

Rust patterns on the old Church Cliff breakwaters

Old sea defences at Church Cliff Part 1

Storm debris on Monmouth Beach

 

ROCKS and FOSSILS

Patterns made by trace fossils at Lyme Regis

Benjamin and the pebble full of holes

Rock strata at Lyme Regis Part 1

Fossil wood at Lyme Regis

Curious sea wall rocks at Lyme Regis

Stone sun stars at Lyme Regis

Blue Lias strata at Lyme Regis Part 1

Fossil woodgrain patterns from Lyme Regis – natural colouration

Natural fracture patterns in rocks

Petrified wood – digital art

Stone steps on the Cobb

Rock on the Cobb

A few Jurassic Coast pebbles

 

SEAWEED

Oarweed at Lyme Regis

Oarweed in shallow water video clip

Natural pattern of seaweed on rock

 

SEASHORE CREATURES

Lobster pots and Honeycomb tubes at Lyme Regis in February

Rocks with holes made by piddocks Part 1

Common piddocks – rock boring molluscs

Some snakelocks anemone variations

 

FLOTSAM and DRIFTWOOD

Lyme Regis driftwood patterns

Spalted driftwood from Lyme Regis

Stripped shore and driftwood at Lyme Regis in February

Beach art 6 – driftwood and stone sculpture

 

OTHER

Rusty relics on Monmouth Beach at Lyme Regis

Fishing nets on the Cobb at Lyme Regis

Lyme waves and seafoam

Fishermen’s ropes on the Cobb

Fishing nets 2

Beach art 2 – smile

 

7 Replies to “Jurassic Coast Beaches – Posts about Lyme Regis”

  1. I read a lot of books set in Great Britain and the town’s name is familiar to me but I had no visual of it. These photos are stunning. The patterns of nature that you captured. I marvel at your ability to see and catch the beauty and the science together in these images.

  2. Thank you, Claudia. You are always so generous with your comments. You might know the name Lyme Regis from a book like “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” which is a 1969 postmodern historical fiction novel by John Fowles. They made a film of it starring Meryl Streep and Jeremy Irons. The town itself is interesting with lots of lovely buildings, nooks and crannies. Maybe I will post some non-nature pictures on my other site some time to show you what a beautiful place it is. In hot sunny weather such as we are experiencing at the moment in England, there are many visitors and everything looks busy, bright, and colourful. I have had some very happy moments there.

  3. Yes, I have read the “French Lieutenant’s Woman”, and now I remember, but I am thinking something crime. And Jane Austen. Not at the same time or the same book! Well, doesn’t matter, I’d love to see any photos of it you’ve taken. It sounds like a person could have a lot of interesting things happen to them there (forgive that grammar wreck). Lots of scope for almost anything, in a setting like that.

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