About winderjssc

Jessica Winder has a background in ecological studies in both the museum and the research laboratory. She is passionate about the natural world right on our doorsteps. She is enthusiastic about capturing what she sees through photography and wants to open the eyes of everyone to the beauty and fascination of nature. She is author of 'Jessica's Nature Blog' at https://natureinfocus.wordpress.com. Jessica has also extensively researched macroscopic variations in oyster and other edible marine mollusc shells from archaeological excavations as a means of understanding past exploitation of marine shellfish resources. She is an archaeo-malacological consultant through Oysters etc. and is publishing summaries of her shell research work on the WordPress Blog called 'Oysters etc.' at http://oystersetcetera.wordpress.com 'Photographic Salmagundi' at http://photosalmagundi.wordpress.com is a showcase of photographs and digital art on all sorts of subjects - not just natural history.

Fractured 11-14

Natural fracture patterns in Jurassic rocks at Seatown in Dorset, England, re-coloured with digital wizardry.

The Shore Below the New Sea Wall (Part 2)

The rock ledges below the new sea wall at Church Cliffs in Lyme Regis, Dorset, are the upper strata of the Blue Lias limestone. The natural limestone ledges and the smooth artificial substrate of the concrete sea wall,  provide a home for numerous seashore creatures like limpets, winkles, and top shells as well as many commonly attached red, green and brown seaweeds, and encrusting calcareous algae (pink Lithamnion). The brown substance sticking to a lot of limpet shells is also an encrusting seaweed (probably Brown Limpet Paint Ralfsia verrucosa).

Multitudes of small holes penetrating the rocks are the often-occupied burrows of small marine polychaete worms like the Polydora species. Occasional drifts of sandy ripples coating the stone are punctured by largish round holes where bivalved burrowing piddocks living in the rocks below have squirted jets of water from their exhalent siphons and cleared the sand away.

It is interesting to see that the seashore life is equally at home on the old concrete footings from the defunct breakwaters as it is on the limestone.

The Shore Below the New Sea Wall (Part 1)

The shore beneath the new sea wall in Lyme Regis looks very different now the old breakwaters or groynes have been removed. You can still see the linear concrete footings of the old wood and iron structures but most of the pebbles and cobbles that used to accumulate between the walls are now absent (at least for the moment). A bare rock pavement is revealed, comprising a series of steps representing the strata and colonised by seaweeds. Rippled sand sometimes deposits in the valleys between the rock ledges.

Strong Autumn Light

Strong light contrasts in the autumn countryside with sihouetted trees and cattle with long shadows

November sun can be bright and strong creating highlighted patches, long dark shadows, and strong contrasts that are visually stunning but difficult to photograph. These are some of my attempts to capture the light effects on yesterday afternoon’s walk in the Dorset countryside.

Shallow Water Tidal Ripple Patterns 11-14

Natural patterns on rippled water

Shallow Water Tidal Ripple Patterns 11-14 Photographs of natural patterns created by reflected sunlight on the crests of minor ripples in clear shallow seawater lapping with the incoming tide around the island of Burry Holms at the tip of the Gower Peninsula in South Wales. Here shown in negative format to highlight the intricacies of the natural designs.

Natural patterns on rippled water

Natural patterns on rippled water

Natural patterns on rippled water

Arable Fields in Autumn

The countryside is always changing. Not only with the natural seasonal variations but also with the cyclical nature of arable farming. In late October on Charlton Down when the trees and hedges were fast losing their leaves, some fields still bore rows of stubble from a late harvest of crops while others were vibrant green with new growth from an early autumn sowing of cereals.