Natural pattern of cracks and crevices in a rock platform

Jurassic Coast Beaches – Posts about Kimmeridge Bay

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One of my favourite beaches along the Jurassic Coast in Dorset is Kimmeridge Bay. Over the years I have visited many times and taken photographs to help me understand the interactions of all the natural elements of the seashore ecology, and try to capture the abstract beauty of the strata and the variety of the seashore creatures. Click Kimmeridge Bay to see a compilation of these previous posts or look at the list below to find something that might interest you.

POSTS ABOUT KIMMERIDGE BAY

ROCKS AND FOSSILS

Rock pattern and texture at Kimmeridge again

Angel wing pyrite

Crevices and cracks at Kimmeridge Bay

Noughts and crosses at Kimmeridge Bay

Kimmeridge Bay triangles

Rock pavement at Kimmeridge Bay

Ammonites at Kimmeridge Bay

The cliffs at Kimmeridge Bay

Kimmeridge Rocks 1-3

Kimmeridge Rocks 4-6

Kimmeridge Rocks 7-9

Kimmeridge Rocks 7-9

Kimmeridge Rocks 13-15

Kimmeridge Rocks 16-18

Kimmeridge Rocks 19-23

Rock strata from Kimmeridge cliffs Part 1

Rock strata from Kimmeridge cliffs Part 2

 

SEAWEED

Seaweed strands with crinkled kelp

Natural pattern of seaweed on rocks 1

Natural arrangement of seaweed on rocks 2

Natural arrangement of seaweed on rocks 3

Natural pattern of seaweed on rock 5

Kelps at Kimmeridge Bay

 

SEASHORE CREATURES

Flat periwinkles and calcareous seaweed at Kimmeridge

Limpets at Kimmeridge Bay

Beadlet anemones at Kimmeridge Bay

Flat periwinkle perambulating at Kimmeridge Bay

Rough periwinkles at Kimmeridge Bay

Patterns made by grazing limpets

Why am I writing this Blog?

 

6 Replies to “Jurassic Coast Beaches – Posts about Kimmeridge Bay”

  1. I have to figure out how to read your blog posts from the past, in an organized way. I am just astounded by the beauty of what you see and how you capture the images, and the knowledge I gain. I really appreciate the list of earlier posts. I think of it as a book on this topic and can read the “chapters”. I looked at the beadlet post (picked at random for the moment I have right now to look) and I am hooked. Thank you. As for this post, I am struck by the concept of the interaction of the living and non-living parts that make up this one spot on earth, and how every place is similarly detailed and full of beauty. Humbling to think of that. Thank you again.

  2. Hi Claudia. Thank you. These compilations of past posts of certain categories are designed mostly for people using internet search engines who are seeking information about the natural history of certain places along the Jurassic coast. It is not always obvious to the casual searcher that my blog has more than one post on the same topic. It seems a pity to have written so much and taken so many photographs since I started the blog 9 years ago only for them to be hidden in plain sight as it were. So the posts about past posts are written without the intention that they should be read in entirety by Followers. I tend to think of my posts as records of information for the future as well as documenting my small adventures and discoveries. It is true that I am intrigued by the interplay of all aspects of the natural history in individual locations, and think about the interacting processes and histories of organisms with the inanimate environment.

  3. Your references to past posts really helps me, as I am enjoying exploring more into a certain location, once it catches my interest, and the links helps me do that. Searching around, I am sure I would not find all the results and probably lose patience. So I really appreciate it, I can sit down and have a good thorough look at one place and get a feel for it. Armchair traveling and learning from afar. You blog has really re-interested me in looking more closely at rocks in particular and observing my own environment a bit differently. Plus you have such a wonderful eye for the beauty of what you are documenting and for photographing it in such a way to show off that beauty as well as its scientific characteristics.

  4. Thank you for your lovely comments, Claudia. I am pleased that you are finding them useful and interesting. It is very encouraging and supportive.

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