Sand tubes on Studland’s strandline

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Sand tubes on the beach: Empty sand-grain covered tubes made by marine bristle worms (plus a Netted Whelk shell) that washed ashore at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (1) 

Millions of small sandy tubes washed ashore in great piles at Studland in Dorset recently. These are made by marine bristle worms to line their burrows on the sea bed. The tubes were inter-mixed with all sorts of other things including many different types of empty seashells. Most abundant of these were the Netted Whelks, Slipper Limpets, Razor Shells, Cockles, Saddle Oysters, and Sting Winkles. There were many other bivalves and gastropods in smaller numbers scattered over the beach.

In some places the worm tubes were accompanied by thousands of small water-worn pieces of coal and charcoal – making a striking colour combination of yellow and black. A lot of seaweed with soft bodied creatures were also washed ashore but mainly in accumulations distinct from the heaps of sandtubes.

More about SAND-TUBES at Studland.

More about STRANDLINES at Studland.

More about Netted Whelks.

More about Slipper Limpets.

More about Saddle Oysters.

More about Cockles.

More about Razor Shells.

All the postings in Jessica’s Nature Blog about STUDLAND.

Studland Bay strandline with sand tubes: The strandline with piles of empty yellow sand-tubes at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (2) 

Strandline natural debris: Yellow sand tubes made by marine worms, intermingled with pieces of black coal and charcoal, on the strandline at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (3) 

Strandline at Studland Bay: Detail of the strandline showing sand tubes from marine worms, empty Razor Shells, Netted Whelks, and water-worn coal, at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (4) 

Strandline with charcoal and marineworm tubes: Detail of the strandline showing marine worm sand tubes , empty seashells, coal, and charcoal at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (5) 

Strandline at Studland Bay: View of the strandline full of marine worm sandtubes and empty seashells at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (6) 

Strandline natural debris: Detail of the strandline full of marine worm sandtubes and empty seashells at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (7) 

Strandline debris: Close-up of the strandline full of marine worm sandtubes, and empty Slipper Limpets, Razor Shells, Sting Winkles, and Netted Whelks (one with a minute Hermit Crab) at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (8) 

Detail of Studland strandline: Close-up of the strandline full of marine worm sandtubes, and empty Slipper Limpets, Razor Shells, Sting Winkles, and Netted Whelks (one with a minute Hermit Crab) at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (9) 

Strandline debris: Close-up of the strandline full of marine worm sandtubes, showing a crab claw and cockle shell, at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (10) 

Strandline details: Close-up of the strandline full of marine worm sandtubes, showing empty Razor Shell, Saddle Oyster, and Netted Whelks, at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (11) 

Strandline debris at Studland Bay: Close-up of the strandline full of marine worm sandtubes, showing a Slipper Limpet and Netted Whelk shells, at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (12) 

Revision of a post first published 10 March 2010

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved

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