Hill End to Spaniard Rocks & Back: Step-by-Step Part 7

Walking back from Spaniard Rocks now, I took a route closer to the dunes where the character of the shore is quite different from the wet sand and strandlines between high and low tide levels. Here there are pebbles. Rhossili’s pebbles intrigue me. I love scrambling over the banks of stones at the very top of the beach. The colours are lovely pastel shades with pinks and blues and overall reminding me of sugared almonds. A total delight. Many rock types are represented. Some have interesting patterns.

I like the way that the numbers of beach stones seem to increase or decrease depending on how they are pushed around the shore between one visit and the next, and how the sand changes its level and distribution throughout the year and the transition from season to season. This time the wooden ribs and keel of the shipwrecked ketch Anne were only just visible above the sand and pebbles. I like the way that pebbles are arranged partly buried in the damp sand that quickly dries to a different hue and texture. The pebbles underlie the tall sand dunes of the Llangennith Burrows. The dunes have been scooped out by stormy seas and footsteps in many places to demonstrate that even wind-blown sand is stratified; and marram grass roots exposed to air show how deep they penetrate the soft fine sediments to bind them together and stabilise the dunes.

7 thoughts on “Hill End to Spaniard Rocks & Back: Step-by-Step Part 7

  1. Hi, Bob. I actually have a video clip of the Diles Lake water flowing through the pebble bank at Rhossili with its accompanying gurgle noises. That would seem to be relevant to your quotation. I will try to post it but for some time now I have not been very successful in posting videos. Although they are perfect when uploaded to the media library, once they are attached to a post the quality is lost and the picture pixelated.

  2. Thank you, Evelyn. I like the way that the patterns in the pebbles reflect the geological history of the stratum from which the rock originated.

  3. I see the attraction in those pebbles alright Jessica, and nice landscape shots too, adding context. I can nearly smell the sea air!

  4. Thank you, Adrian. There are some really excellent pebbles in your neck of the woods, too, at Inishowen and Malin Head I believe.

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