Barrel-mouthed Jellyfish at Rhossili

Rhizostoma octopus Linnaeus

Barrel-mouthed Jellyfish washed ashore on Rhossili Bay at the base of cliffs near Kitchen Corner, 27th August 2017. One of several seen on the beach yesterday, each one looking different in size, colour, and arrangement of the organs. This one was pale blue and the domed umbrella surface had become turned inside out. The main shot was taken at ground level and into the sun to show how the light was shining right through the jelly. The inserted thumbnail image shows the same specimen viewed from above.

Hill End to Spaniard Rocks & Back: Step-by-Step Part 7

Walking back from Spaniard Rocks now, I took a route closer to the dunes where the character of the shore is quite different from the wet sand and strandlines between high and low tide levels. Here there are pebbles. Rhossili’s pebbles intrigue me. I love scrambling over the banks of stones at the very top of the beach. The colours are lovely pastel shades with pinks and blues and overall reminding me of sugared almonds. A total delight. Many rock types are represented. Some have interesting patterns.

I like the way that the numbers of beach stones seem to increase or decrease depending on how they are pushed around the shore between one visit and the next, and how the sand changes its level and distribution throughout the year and the transition from season to season. This time the wooden ribs and keel of the shipwrecked ketch Anne were only just visible above the sand and pebbles. I like the way that pebbles are arranged partly buried in the damp sand that quickly dries to a different hue and texture. The pebbles underlie the tall sand dunes of the Llangennith Burrows. The dunes have been scooped out by stormy seas and footsteps in many places to demonstrate that even wind-blown sand is stratified; and marram grass roots exposed to air show how deep they penetrate the soft fine sediments to bind them together and stabilise the dunes.

Hill End to Spaniard Rocks & Back: Step-by-Step Part 1

This is the first part of a walk I took along the beach on April 7th, 2017. It shows the images in chronological order, step-by-step as I progressed along the shore. Starting at the Hill End car park on the tip of the Gower Peninsula, I took the short path through the dunes to Rhossili beach and turned right (north) towards the Spaniard Rocks which lie near the tidal island of Burry Holms. The tide was out and the beach had been scooped into hollows by the retreating waves. The sand was covered with fine black coal particles, plants stems, and wood fragments with many seashells and dead starfish making patterns on the shore. Young gulls and crows were feasting on the strandline debris.

You can click on any picture to see the whole gallery in enlarged format.