Wet pebbles at the water's edge in Pleasant Bay, Cape Breton Island, NS.

We visited Pleasant Bay on a misty May day. It lies on the Cabot Trail in Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada. Pleasant Bay is a small village first settled by Scottish immigrants and is nestled around a picturesque fishing harbour at the foot of steep hills. The Grande Anse River meets the sea at this point and in the background are the headlands and mountains of the Blair River Inlier composed of some of the oldest rocks in the world. The village itself lies on Carboniferous sedimentary rocks but these are less well represented in the pebbles on the beach than the more ancient igneous and metamorphic rocks like granites, gneisses and schists that have been transported downstream from the surrounding highlands. You can compare these smooth rounded wave-worn beach stones with the angular rock fragments lying on the river bed at MacIntosh Brook and the Grand Anse River near Lone Shieling not too far away.

4 Replies to “Pebbles at Pleasant Bay”

  1. Thank you, Central Ohio Nature. The differences in the colours and patterns have the potential to reveal so much about the surrounding landscape and its history but it is difficult to interpret. I was once sent a gift of Maine pebbles – I will have to look them out for a comparison.

  2. As usual, the pebbles look better and reveal their true colours and patterns when they are wet. Each subtle difference can reveal to the expert the nature of their composition, their formation process, and age. That is an ongoing fascination for me.

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