Clustered Periwinkles at Whiteford

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Large groups of common winkles clustered around the base of large stones on the beach

At low tide many thousands of common winkles or periwinkles (Littorina littorea Linnaeus) seek shelter from dessication and predation by clustering together in the few hiding places available on the beach. At Whiteford Sands these niches include the overhung bases of larger stones, crevices in ancient timbers from the rapidly emerging submerged forest, and nooks and crannies in the recently exposed ancient peat. Alternating layers of peat and clay, overlain by rocks from glacial till, provide algae-covered surfaces on which gastropods can feed, and islands of low tide refuge in the vast expanses of sand on this sea shore.

Large groups of common winkles clustered around the base of large stones on the beach

Large groups of common winkles clustered around the base of large stones on the beach

Large groups of common winkles clustered around the base of large stones on the beach

Large groups of common winkles clustered around submerged forest wood on the beach

Large groups of common winkles clustered around submerged forest wood on the beach

Large groups of common winkles clustered around submerged forest wood on the beach

Large groups of common winkles clustered in exposed ancient peat beds on the beach

Large groups of common winkles clustered around submerged forest wood on the beach

4 Replies to “Clustered Periwinkles at Whiteford”

  1. Yes, that’s right, although there is some mobilisation while the tide is out. Last summer I photographed all sorts of tracks and trails in the soft sediments of the beach, and these included trails made by common winkles. I’ll post the images to Jessica’s Nature Blog soon.

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