Rocks at Fermoyle on the Dingle Peninsula

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Red Devonian sandstone rocks at the beach with fucoid seaweeds

The place where I took these photographs is marked on the map as an island but it is actually just a tiny promontory near to the village of Fermoyle, along the Dingle Way, on the north coast of the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland. I am sure that most people visit the location for its wonderful long unsullied sandy beach. However, I was drawn to this particular part, at the extreme western end of the beach, because of its fascinating geomorphology. The rocks are sandstones and conglomerates (mostly but not exclusively red) of the Glengarriff Harbour Group from the Devonian Period. The bright olive, lime, yellow and orange colours of the seaweeds, and the black, yellow and white of encrusting lichens, clash garishly with the red rocks. The rock strata are clearly defined: sometimes on-end, sometimes as flat bedding planes, and in one place a dome of strata lies cut-away and exposed. Beach stones rather than pebbles cover a portion of this area; and there are also occasional huge boulders composed of conglomerate scattered along the shore nearest the inlet from Brandon Bay.

12 Replies to “Rocks at Fermoyle on the Dingle Peninsula”

  1. Thank you, Linda. Yes, I took a lot more pictures than I posted! Lots of seaweed (I posted some videos of seaweed swaying in the water some time ago) and the sandy shore as well.

  2. Yes, Ireland is an incredible place. I can’t understand how it took me so long to discover what wonderful things it has to offer.

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