Rusty iron on Ringstead beach: Detail from a rusty iron ship wreck at Ringstead Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (1)

Colours, textures, abstract patterns – the rusty iron wreck at Ringstead Bay has it all. Fascinating to observe from visit to visit as it shifts, breaks up, changes. These rapidly corroding remains have lain on the shingle beach for years but I have failed in finding out anything about them.

Detail from a rusty iron ship wreck at Ringstead Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (2)

Detail from a rusty iron ship wreck at Ringstead Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (3) 

Texture of rusty iron: Detail from a rusty iron ship wreck at Ringstead Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (4)

The rusting remains of an iron ship wreck at Ringstead Bay, Dorset, UK (part of the Jurassic Coast) (5)

The rusting remains of an iron ship wreck at Ringstead Bay, Dorset, UK (part of the Jurassic Coast) (6) 

 Revision of a post first published 24 October 2009

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved

7 Replies to “Rusty wreck at Ringstead”

  1. I know that people think of rust in a negative way, primarily because it means that something is disintegrating – just think about the discovery of a rusty panel under the paintwork of your car. It means cost, remedial action, replacement. However, if you can detatch your thoughts from any idea of possession, and view the object as an article undergoing an element-induced natural transformation, it becomes more interesting than worrying. The whole array or orange and brown hues, the wonderful deep purples that arise, the infinitely varied surface textures, the way that old rivets seem to be erupting from the corroding metal plates, make these rusty iron objects into colourful abstract sculptures.

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  2. Hi Jess – I like the pictures of Rusty the Wreck. One of the photos shows 3 sections – is the wreck in 3 sections or is it 3 separate wrecks. can’t recall seeing them in the past but maybe they were covered at the time – Roy

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  3. Thank you, Steve. I find the colours, textures and patterns of rust very attractive. I’ve taken lots of photographs on rusting seaside metal objects – like the bolts in wooden beach groynes and decaying ironwork beneath seaside piers. Most of those pictures are over on my website rather than the nature blog. You are right about the appeal of the contrast between the results of a natural process on a man-made object.

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  4. Hello, Roy. I think they are all pieces of the same wreck. There are smaller bits under the shingle at the water line. The pebbles do move around a lot so it is entirely possible that everything was hidden from view the last time you visited. I’ve noticed the bigger parts breaking up over the ten years that I have been photographing the wreck.There might not be much left as recogniseable structures after another couple of winters.

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