Shoe on the beach: Flip-flop sandal washed ashore on a Gower beach, South Wales, UK (22) 

This is the second in the series of images of lost and abandoned footwear: shoes, boots, slippers, trainers and flip-flops found on the strandlines of Gower beaches. Some, like the wellington boots, have probably been lost overboard from pleasure or work boats; or from the back of the trailers and tractors that ferry cockle and mussel fishermen from shore to shore. Others might have been lost in the dark after late night beach parties; or washed away when the tide came in more quickly than expected while swimmers were in the water. I find it fascinating when shoes have obviously been in the sea a long time and have hydroids or barnacles attached. Other shoes I rediscover on different occasions and in different places; each time a little more worse for wear. Maybe one of these shoes belongs to you? Have a look and see.

If your lost shoe isn’t here, look in later posts on the same subject as I have many more examples in my collection still to show. 

Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe insole (23)
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (24) Pale green flip-flop
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (25) Black sandal
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (26) Light trainer with black sole
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (27) Light blue flip-flop
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (28) Black trainer
 
shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (29) Grey and white trainer
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (30) Blue trainer
 
Flotsam shoe: Gower Beached Shoe (31) - what's left of it!
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (32) Brown walking boot with marine growths attached
 
Flotsam shoe: Gower Beached Shoe (33) Green wellington boot
 
Flotsam shoe: Gower Beached Shoe (34) Yellow wellington boot
 
Flotsam shoe: Gower Beached Shoe (35) Black wellington boot
 
Flotsam shoe: Gower Beached Shoe (36) Brown slip-on mule with goose barnacles attached
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (37) Brown slip-on mule with goose barnacles attached
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (38) Blue walking boot
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (39) Red and white trainer
 
Flotsam shoe: Gower Beached Shoe (40) Brown walking boot
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (41) White trainer
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (42) Blue walking boot
 
Shoe on the beach: Gower Beached Shoe (43) Disintegrating tan leather work boot with rusty steel toe-cap
 

Revision of a post first published 8 November 2009

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved 

7 Replies to “Beached Shoes on Gower (2)”

  1. I took these photos over a few separate days on two particular beaches. I suppose I would expect to see at least a dozen shoes each time I walk along these shores. I have about fifty more pictures from this year but sometimes I find the same shoes on subsequent visits. I also find various items of clothing (like jackets, trousers, and underwear) and beach goods (such as buckets, spades, goggles, and flippers). I’ll photograph any kind of flotsam on the beach.
    If I have lots of images to display for a posting, and I suspect they will have limited appeal for most viewers, then I try to group them to save space – either in a gallery with columns, or as a slideshow.

    Like

  2. It is rather strange isn’t it, that people seem to be so careless with their shoes and clothes on British beaches. Or could it possibly be that everything that gets lost from your side of the Atlantic gets washed over to our shores! Did you realise that there is clear water between the tip of the Gower Peninsula with its Rhossili beach and the eastern coastline of Canada, the USA and South America? The ‘fetch’ (as its called) for Rhossili is 4000 kilometres.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: