All Sorts from the Studland Strandline

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Sea Squirts washed ashore at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (1) 

Bits and pieces spotted on the strandline when I last walked at Studland Bay in Dorset a week or so ago. Roll your cursor over the images to see what they are. Click on the photographs to see them full size.

Saddle Oyster shell: A burial-blackened Saddle Oyster shell with a white frond of dead Coral Weed on the strandline at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (2) 

Studland strandline sponge: Orange-coloured sponge with brown, green, and red seaweeds and eel grass on the strandline at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (3) 

Living Rayed Trough Shell (Mactra stultorum (Linnaeus) with siphons protruding, from the strandline at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (4) 

Seaweed holdfast: A detached holdfast from the end of a kelp stalk on wet sand of the strandline at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (5) 

Norway Cockle shells: The paired valves of a Norway Cockle on the strandline at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (6) 

Manila Clam, Tapes philippinarum (Adams & Reeve) - on the strandline at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (7) 

Striped Venus shell: A living Striped Venus Shell - Chamelea gallina (Linnaeus) - with bubbles in the surf at Studland Bay, Dorset, UK - part of the Jurassic Coast (8) 

Revision of a post first published 15 March 2010

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved

5 Replies to “All Sorts from the Studland Strandline”

  1. I’ve been getting lots of squirts on my Normandy strandlines too. That large, strikingly marked clam is the Manila Clam, Tapes philippinarum. It was introduced to the UK for farming some years ago and has naturalised because our water temperatures have crept up just high enough to sustain recruitment.

  2. Thanks for the information, Jan. I’ll check that out. I have some literature filed away on the cultivation of Manila Clams in the UK produced by MAFF some years ago – if I can find it. Apologies for the error. It was a live specimen that I returned to the surf so I only had the external view but I did wonder at the overall reticulation.

  3. I wonder how many species are identical on both sides of the Atlantic? I must investigate sometime soon. Being a bookseller, could you recommend any suitable guides to seashore life for the east coast of the U.S. please?

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