The Beach Below The Spittles 2

Pieces of shale on the beach with holes made by piddocks

After the beach boulders and scattered rusty metal debris, there is sequence of flat rock platforms exposed by the retreating water. They are riddled with holes made by the boring bivalves known as piddocks, some burrows just have empty shells in them but others are still occupied by the living molluscs that squirt water a foot or more into the air at frequent intervals. A velvet swimming crab mooches around the edges of the platforms, and sand tube and mud tube dwelling worms abound on all the surfaces.

The Beach Below The Spittles

Rusty painted metal junk on the seashore with rocks

I discovered an interesting stretch of shoreline when I visited Lyme Regis yesterday. The cliff location is known as The Spittles and it is situated immediately east of the new sea wall. The tide was going out but not as far as in March 2010. Enough to disclose an array of boulders with scattered fossils, broken coloured glass, and rusting metal. The man-made junk resulted from a major landslide in 2008 when the contents of an old town rubbish tip (which had been in existence from 1920 to 1973) cascaded shore-wards with the rocks and mud. The junk continues to wear out of the cliff face to the present time.

There are some interesting items to be found. The rusting metal components, often with remnants of paint, provide intriguing contrasts with the natural environment in which they are lodged. There is a striking similarity between the metal colours and textures and those of the dead and dying autumnal colours of seaweed. As the water receded, it left intricate patterns in the sand around the rocks and even in fine sediments of smoother rock surfaces.

Sea Foam Tide-marks on Rusty Iron

Dried sea foam on rusty iron

I noted an interesting phenomenon at Weymouth in Dorset recently. The rusty iron panels of the pier structure exhibited tide-marks or tide-lines of dried sea foam from a previous high water. I have never seen that before. The contrasting colours, patterns, and textures of the creamy lines against the multi-coloured oxidising metal made interesting compositions.

Wikipedia says about sea foam:

Sea foam, ocean foam, beach foam, or spume is a type of foam created by the agitation of seawater, particularly when it contains higher concentrations of dissolved organic matter (including proteins, lignins, and lipids)[1] derived from sources such as the offshore breakdown of algal blooms. These compounds can act as surfactants or foaming agents. As the seawater is churned by breaking waves in the surf zone adjacent to the shore, the presence of these surfactants under these turbulent conditions traps air, forming persistent bubbles that stick to each other through surface tension. Due to its low density and persistence, foam can be blown by strong on-shore winds from the beachface inland.

Barnacles on rusty iron

Barnacles growing on the rusty iron of a British seaside pier (1)

Barnacles (and a few limpets) growing on the multi-coloured and highly textured surface of rusty ironwork on a British seaside pier. I like the wide range of rust colours from dark blue to light orange and how they are distributed over the surface in a random way resembling a piece of bright abtract art; and the way that the acorn barnacles have become stained and incorporated into the natural design.

Barnacles growing on the rusty iron of a British seaside pier (2)

Rust-stained barnacles: Barnacles growing on the rusty iron of a British seaside pier (3)

Seashore creatures picture: Barnacles growing on the rusty iron of a British seaside pier (4)

Rusty iron with barnacles: Barnacles growing on the rusty iron of a British seaside pier (5)

British barnacles picture: Barnacles growing on the rusty iron of a British seaside pier (6)

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