Worked Stone – Veltha by Emily Young

I am overwhelmed by the beauty of the Emily Young sculptures that are periodically exhibited in London locations for all to appreciate. Not only is the working of the stone exquisite but the selection of the stone for the work itself is amazing. As an amateur geologist I am fascinated by the range of colours, patterns, and textures naturally occurring in rocks, and to see them used to such great advantage is a privilege. I discovered an exhibition of Emily Young’s sculpted heads in the Southwood Garden attached to St James’ Church near Piccadilly on my last visit to London. They will be on display until January 2018. These pictures show aspects of a sculpted head called Veltha which is created in brecciated onyx, and it is displayed by courtesy of Bowman Sculpture.

Gabions as Art & Architecture

At Whitstable Harbour gabions have been put to good use in the construction of a remarkable feature. Approaching the construction I could see an intriguing pale line across the darker pebbles, very reminiscent of the pale lines of empty oyster shells that I had just been seeing on the pebble beaches between the breakwaters. Closer inspection proved the pale line to be a symbolic tide line of man-made decorated ceramic pebbles. The feature is known as the Deck at Dead Man’s Corner and is supposed to resemble the bow of a ship, the wall a pebbly beach, and the vertical timber structures are made to the same specification as the groynes along the shore. The ‘tide line’ is a key feature of white ceramic pebbles set into the face of the wall. These were made by local people during a series of public workshops and classes held at the Community College Whitstable. The whole structure comprises seating and a stage built in 2011 for gatherings and events.

The Hive at Kew

The Hive installation and experience at Kew Gardens, London.

“The Hive is a unique world class installation and experience created by artist Wolfgang Buttress, Simmonds Studio, Stage One and BDP. Pollination is important for our food security – one third of global crop yield is dependent, to some extent, on bees and other pollinators. In highlighting the importance of pollination in our food chain, The Hive poses one of the most pressing questions of our time – how can we protect our pollinators in order to feed our growing population? Illuminated by almost 1,000 LED lights, The Hive represents a vast honey bee hive. It’s linked to one of Kew’s hives and the lights flicker in time to vibrations caused when the bees communicate with one another. Wolfgang was inspired by work of Dr. Martin Benscik at Nottingham Trent University, who has developed technology to monitor the health of bee hives. His research is a prime example of how British science and creativity is helping solve global challenges.”

“What’s the buzz?

Experience four types of vibration caused by honey bees as they communicate inside a hive. Hear these bee “messages” through bone conduction where vibrations pass through bones in your head, instead of through your eardrums. The vibrations have been recorded using accelerometers by Dr. Martin Benscik, reader in physics in Nottingham Trent University.”

Accompanying the 17 metre high structure is a beautiful symphony of orchestral sounds performed in the key of C – the same key that bees buzz in. Together, the sound and light swell and diminish as the energy levels in Kew’s beehive surge.”

Quotes from on-site information noticeboards at The Hive in Kew Gardens

Clastic Igneous Rock – Tempesta at Neo Bankside

Carved head called Tempesta made from clastic igneous rock by Emily Young

This wonderful sculpture, Tempesta, is one of a group carved with consummate skill by Emily Young from multi-patterned and textured clastic igneous rock. I am unable to find the source of the stone.  It is displayed, courtesy of Bowman Sculpture, at Neo Bankside behind the Tate Modern Gallery in London, England. The rock is amazing in its complexity and the work has taken advantage of the challenging medium by exploiting both its natural beauty and its flaws.

Carved head called Tempesta made from clastic igneous rock by Emily Young

Carved head called Tempesta made from clastic igneous rock by Emily Young

Carved head called Tempesta made from clastic igneous rock by Emily Young

Carved head called Tempesta made from clastic igneous rock by Emily Young

Animal Art in Oregon

Fish crashing through a wall in Portland, Oregon, USA

Just for fun, a few pictures of animal art and sculpture that I randomly photographed while visiting Eugene, Yachats, and Portland in Oregon on the north-west Pacific Coast of America. With the exception perhaps of the parrot, they reflect the widespread appreciation of the rich wildlife of the region.

Seafood – Mosaic in an Underpass

Mosaic of old-fashioned fishmongers shop

This delightful mosaic of a seafood display in an old-fashioned fishmonger’s shop is one of many public art mosaics decorating pedestrian underpasses in Newport, South Wales.

Detail of crabs in a mosaic picture of a fishmonger shop

Detail of fish depicted in a mosaic

Close-up detail of lobsters in a mosaicCOPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2014  All Rights Reserved

Sea Fishing Celebrated in Lunenburg Art

The UNESCO World Heritage Site of Lunenburg in Nova Scotia, Canada, is proud of its maritime heritage and long history of sea-fishing, which continues to the present. This sea faring tradition is celebrated in the streets by public art works of painted metal sculptures depicting the various sea food creatures.