The Beach Below The Spittles 2

Pieces of shale on the beach with holes made by piddocks

After the beach boulders and scattered rusty metal debris, there is sequence of flat rock platforms exposed by the retreating water. They are riddled with holes made by the boring bivalves known as piddocks, some burrows just have empty shells in them but others are still occupied by the living molluscs that squirt water a foot or more into the air at frequent intervals. A velvet swimming crab mooches around the edges of the platforms, and sand tube and mud tube dwelling worms abound on all the surfaces.

The Beach Below The Spittles

Rusty painted metal junk on the seashore with rocks

I discovered an interesting stretch of shoreline when I visited Lyme Regis yesterday. The cliff location is known as The Spittles and it is situated immediately east of the new sea wall. The tide was going out but not as far as in March 2010. Enough to disclose an array of boulders with scattered fossils, broken coloured glass, and rusting metal. The man-made junk resulted from a major landslide in 2008 when the contents of an old town rubbish tip (which had been in existence from 1920 to 1973) cascaded shore-wards with the rocks and mud. The junk continues to wear out of the cliff face to the present time.

There are some interesting items to be found. The rusting metal components, often with remnants of paint, provide intriguing contrasts with the natural environment in which they are lodged. There is a striking similarity between the metal colours and textures and those of the dead and dying autumnal colours of seaweed. As the water receded, it left intricate patterns in the sand around the rocks and even in fine sediments of smoother rock surfaces.

Fault Zone Rocks at Clarke Head Part 3

Broken rocks on the beach at Clarke Head, Nova Scotia, Canada.

More pictures of the beach at Clarke Head showing the multiplicity of rock colours, patterns, and textures of the boulders, broken rocks, and small shards derived from the jagged cliffs of the fault zone. Looking at these photographs now, I am transported right back to the great time I had exploring this location – one of many that I visited on my rock hounding tour of Nova Scotia earlier this year.

 

Rip-Rap Rocks at Seatown

View looking west at Seatown beach, Dorset, England, showing rip-rap sea defences in foreground

The cliffs are eroding in many places along the Dorset coast, particularly where the rocks are soft. This results in land slips and mud slides. It has always been going on but in recent years the erosional processes seem to have accelerated along with changing weather conditions. At Seatown on the coast near Chideock in Dorset, large boulders have been imported to protect the shore from the sea adjacent to the Anchor Inn that sits at the mouth of the River Char. I cannot name the rock types represented in the rip-rap for certain since they are not local to the area and have been chosen specifically because they are harder and more resistant than the cliffs on this beach. I am not even sure that they were quarried in Britain. However, some of them remind me a lot of Carboniferous limestone with fossils, calcite and haematite inclusions. Anyway, they are really interesting and well worth a closer look. The patterns, colours, and textures are amazing. I would like to visit again when the rocks are wet and the more subtle colour variations would be highlighted.

Cape Enrage Rocks 2

Cape Enrage is one of the many spectacular stop-off points as you travel along the north shore of the Bay of Fundy on the east coast of Canada. The cliffs are composed of thick and thin layers of sandstones, mudstones, and conglomerates that built up along river beds and valleys about 320 million years ago. The ancient river channels can be seen in cross-section in the exposed and weathering strata. The way that the rocks are fracturing and splitting up into their component layers makes many intriguing natural abstract patterns. Plant debris that piled up on the river banks as it was washed downstream in the Carboniferous period has been preserved as fossils.

Cape Enrage Rocks 1

Cape Enrage in New Brunswick, on the north shore of the Bay of Fundy, is a popular site for visitors because of its fantastic geology. The rocks are composed of Carboniferous Period Ward Point Member sandstones and mudstones of the Enrage Formation and the Cumberland Group. The almost vertically inclined rock layers in the cliff fracture and weather to create wonderful abstract patterns. The sediments that make up the rocks are fluvial in origin, originally deposited by rivers, and the exposed cliff-section shows many in-filled river channels. Large areas of rippled surface can be seen where channels are exposed; this together with chunks of rock with cross-bedding is interpreted as point bars in which the channels were constantly migrating laterally (as in present day braided river channels before they enter the sea). Localities with conglomerate composed of sandstone with rounded pebbles represent the the centre of river channels where the flow was fastest, or where flash floods have deposited heavier loads.

Wet Boulders at Eype

Beach boulder in shingle at the water's edge

At Eype, blue clay cliffs slip, and subsequently unsupported rock strata above it collapse. Large boulders then roll down to the shingle shore. The variety of rock types, and sometimes the fossils within them (like belemnites), can be observed at close quarters. The newly surf-washed rocks, part-embedded in the bright orange pea-gravel and pebbles, make striking compositions with the wet surfaces revealing a greater intensity of colour, and finer detail of texture and structure.

Click here for earlier posts about EYPE.