Up-date on the multi-coloured rock pool at Rhossili

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Rock pool recovering from plastic pollution in October 2009. The water is fairly clear. (1) 

Previously I have talked about a small rock pool at Rhossili that had filled up  with  multi-coloured pieces of plastic probably arriving at this one small area of the beach from hundreds, even thousands, of miles away. Bright coloured fragments and pellets of plastic were also observable in the regurgitated remains spewed up by seabirds on the beach. That was back in the summer 2009. I have been keeping an eye on the pool to see what its fate might be.

Rock pool recovering from plastic pollution in October 2009 (2) 

By October 2009, high tides seemed to have mostly cleaned out the pool and it looked on the road to recovery.

The rock pool filled again with plant remains and plastic by winter seas. January 2010 (3) 

By January 2010 the pool was contaminated again. However, a large proportion of the rubbish in the pool this time was organic. Vegetable remains included straw-like terrestrial plant stems, broken fronds of brown seaweeds, and the large air bladders of Egg Wrack.

For earlier postings related to the plastic pollution in this pool, click here Multi-coloured Rock Pool at Rhossili and More about the multi-coloured rock pool at Rhossili.

Plant remains and plastic rubbish trapped again in the pool over winter. 1 January 2010 (4) 

Plant and plastic rubbish trapped again in a high rock pool over winter. 1 January 2010 (5) 

Revision of a post first published 19 January 2010

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved

4 Replies to “Up-date on the multi-coloured rock pool at Rhossili”

  1. All this plastic floating around the seas makes me sick – a Nobel prize to anyone that can invent a machine to clear it from the waves and if possible from the shore.

    On a positive note, however – there’s a nice crop of samphire growing on the rocks there!

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  2. Yes, plastic is such a problem on beaches. I have seen it collected from the shore and burnt to consolidate and to prevent further dispersion. It is not even very easy to recycle or dispose of plastics on a local domestic scale – and yet is probably the type of rubbish that accumulates most frequently in households.

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