Tree bark patterns & textures – Part 1

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Tree bark pattern and texture (1)

Tree bark exhibits a fantastic range of colours, patterns and textures. These vary according to the species of tree, it’s age, and the environmental conditions in which it is developing. Altogether a fascinating subject for photography and inspiration for art and design. These barks can be rough or smooth; thick and cracked or thin and peeling; with regular patterns or chaotic abstract designs; muted colours or bright hues. Within particular tree types, the appearance of the bark can be dramatically different from specimen to specimen – and even on an individual tree. These patterns in nature have long been a source of inspiration for both fine and applied art. 

This post is the first in a series that illustrates the range of bark patterns, colours, and textures that can be seen in the British countryside and in our public parks and gardens.

Natural patterns: Tree bark pattern and texture (2)

Bark with blue-green lichen: Tree bark pattern and texture (3)

Deeply cracked conifer bark: Tree bark pattern and texture (4)

Bark cracks and layers: Tree bark pattern and texture (5)

Tree bark pattern and texture (6)

Natural abstract bark pattern: Tree bark pattern and texture (7) 

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved  

2 Replies to “Tree bark patterns & textures – Part 1”

  1. Hello, David. I’ll have to get back to you on this question as I am currently away from my home computer and image catalogue with data. I’ll contact you when I get back home – but it will be a wee while.

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