I live in a beautiful part of the world and I am lucky enough to be surrounded by peaceful countryside. I do not have to venture far from my front door to discover interesting colours, patterns and textures in nature. Here are a few of the things I saw on my walk today. Dandelion clocks in the local nature reserve; tadpoles at the edge of the village pond;  lichen on a headstone;  lichen on a beech tree; bark on a horse chestnut tree; and lichen on the the village hall.



COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2012

All Rights Reserved 

6 Replies to “Nature near home”

  1. I know gardeners hate them but I love dandelions in all their stages. I childishly blow the clocks to tell them time and love watching the seeds flying away.
    Lovely photos as always. I wonder if a photo montage of lots of them would work as a poster…..

    Like

  2. Dandelion clocks are just so lovely aren’t they?

    My pictures do make into excellent poster collages. I did a couple a while back with seashore pictures. The problem is deciding which images to include in any new one – what the theme would be. Suggestions welcome. At the moment I have a series of frames – some in the outer hall of the apartment block I live in – and I rotate the photographs on a regular basis to please myself – and hopefully entertain my neighbours.

    Like

  3. Do you call them dandelion “clocks”? I have never heard that term before. We call them dandelion puffballs. I like the hands and the second-to-last photo especially.

    Like

  4. They are called dandelion clocks because you can use them (allegedly) to tell the time! In the UK children know that if you pick a dandelion seed head and try to blow the seeds away, then the number of blows that it takes to remove all the fluffy seeds is the time of day it is.

    Like

  5. In the United States, children are urged to blow out all the seeds and then your wish will come true. Of course we can never blow out all the seeds at once…so I guess most of us are a little disappointed. I like your story!

    Like

  6. Thanks, Kathy. It is interesting how different cultures develop different stories about the same subjects.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: