Patterned Sand RB April 2017b

Patterns on beach sand

Patterned Sand 8 – 14: Naturally formed patterns of black sediment on yellow sand were photographed on the beach at Rhossili Bay, Gower, in April 2017. The black sediments were mainly composed of minute pieces of rotten wood, coal dust, and miniscule fish bones, with a small proportion of seeds. The images have been digitally colour-enhanced to emphasise the patterns of this natural abstract art.

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Rippled Water BH 2016b

Rippled Water 7 – 15: Natural patterns of shallow wind-rippled water in sandy pools near the tidal island of Burry Holms, Rhossili, Gower, in South Wales. The original photographs have been colour-modified to highlight the lines of reflected sunlight that trace the surface sculpturing of the water.

Patterned Sand RB 2017a

Patterns on beach sand

Patterned Sand 1-7 – Naturally formed patterns of black sediment on yellow sand were photographed on the beach at Rhossili Bay, Gower, in April 2017. The black sediments were mainly composed of minute pieces of rotten wood, coal dust, and miniscule fish bones, with a small proportion of seeds. The images have been digitally colour-enhanced to emphasise the patterns of this wonderful natural abstract art.

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Patterns on beach sand

Rippled Water BH 2016a

Natural patterns in wind-rippled water

Natural patterns in wind-rippled water

Natural patterns in wind-rippled water

Natural patterns in wind-rippled water

Natural patterns in wind-rippled water

Natural patterns in wind-rippled water

Rippled Water 1-6 – Natural patterns of shallow wind-rippled water in sandy pools near the tidal island of Burry Holms, Rhossili, Gower, in South Wales. The original photograph has been colour-modified to highlight the lines of reflected sunlight tracing the surface sculpturing of the water.

The Hive at Kew

The Hive installation and experience at Kew Gardens, London.

“The Hive is a unique world class installation and experience created by artist Wolfgang Buttress, Simmonds Studio, Stage One and BDP. Pollination is important for our food security – one third of global crop yield is dependent, to some extent, on bees and other pollinators. In highlighting the importance of pollination in our food chain, The Hive poses one of the most pressing questions of our time – how can we protect our pollinators in order to feed our growing population? Illuminated by almost 1,000 LED lights, The Hive represents a vast honey bee hive. It’s linked to one of Kew’s hives and the lights flicker in time to vibrations caused when the bees communicate with one another. Wolfgang was inspired by work of Dr. Martin Benscik at Nottingham Trent University, who has developed technology to monitor the health of bee hives. His research is a prime example of how British science and creativity is helping solve global challenges.”

“What’s the buzz?

Experience four types of vibration caused by honey bees as they communicate inside a hive. Hear these bee “messages” through bone conduction where vibrations pass through bones in your head, instead of through your eardrums. The vibrations have been recorded using accelerometers by Dr. Martin Benscik, reader in physics in Nottingham Trent University.”

Accompanying the 17 metre high structure is a beautiful symphony of orchestral sounds performed in the key of C – the same key that bees buzz in. Together, the sound and light swell and diminish as the energy levels in Kew’s beehive surge.”

Quotes from on-site information noticeboards at The Hive in Kew Gardens