Birch bark patterns on beach driftwood

Birch bark abstract pattern on driftwood from the strandline at Whiteford Sands, Gower, West Glamorgan, UK, (1) 

Interesting abstract and repeating patterns, smooth and rough textures, light and dark colours: aspects of the contrasting and naturally occurring designs on the bark of a piece of birch tree driftwood, found on the strandline at Whiteford Sands, Gower.

Coarse, dark, reticulated Birch bark pattern on driftwood from the strandline at Whiteford Sands, Gower, West Glamorgan, UK, (2) 

Contrasting light and dark colours, smooth and rough textures, and abstract versus reticulated pattern on a piece of Birch tree bark on driftwood at Whateford Sands, Gower, West Glamorgan, UK (3)

Natural rough dark pattern around a knot in Birch tree bark on driftwood at Whiteford Sands, Gower, West Glamorgan, UK (4) 

Natural rough dark reticulated bark pattern of Birch driftwood against wet sand at Whiteford , Gower, West Glamorgan, UK (5) 

Rough reticulated pattern in Birch bark on driftwood found atWhiteford beach, Gower, West Glamorgan, UK (6) 

Silver Birch driftwood on the strandline at Whiteford Sands, Gower, West Glamorgan, UK (7)

Silver Birch bark pattern and texture on driftwood from the strandline at Whiteford Sands, Gower, West Glamorgan, UK (8) 

Revision of a post first published 5 May 2010

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved

Beetle burrows on driftwood at Osmington Bay

Patterns in nature: Patterns made by beetle larvae on driftwood at Osmington Bay, Dorset, UK (1)

I saw these curious patterns on a large piece of driftwood washed onto the beach at Osmington Bay. It was partly charred but most noticeable on it were these stripey markings. I thought they had a certain abstract and graphic quality – artistic even.

A closer examination revealed that they were the remains of tunnels created by beetle larvae eating their way along under the bark of the dead tree. Where some bark survived, there were neat bore-holes showing the place that the newly adult insects had emerged.

I am not sure what sort of beetle was responsible for these particular burrows but I’ve read that certain terrestrial Staphylinid Rove Beetles of the Bledus genus rely on sea-soaked timber on the seashore for laying their eggs.

Patterns of beetle larvae tunnels beneath the bark of some driftwood, and emergence holes in the bark, at Osmington Bay, Dorset, UK, part of the Jurassic Coast (2) 

Patterns of beetle larvae tunnels beneath the bark of driftwood at Osmington Bay, Dorset, UK (3)

Pattern of beetle larvae tunnels beneath the bark of driftwood at Osmington Bay, Dorset, UK, part of the Jurassic Coast (4)
 
Pattern of beetle larvae tunnels beneath the bark of driftwood at Osmington Bay, Dorset, UK, part of the Jurassic Coast (5)
 
Driftwood with beetle burrows on the beach at Osmington Bay, Dorset, UK, part of the Jurassic Coast (6) 

Revision of a post first published 19 June 2009

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2011

All Rights Reserved