Rocks at Cape Tribulation

The striped and layered rocks that underlie the promontory at Cape Tribulation look like sedimentary strata. They were just that at one time in the past but they have been  altered and partly metamorphosed into metasedimentary rocks. They belong to a group known as the Hodkingson Formation and are the result of transformations brought about as two tectonic plates of the earth’s crust collided, with one plate then sliding under the other (subduction), generating tremendous heat and pressure that altered existing sedimentary rocks, promoted magma movements below the crust (leading to intrusive igneous rocks), and stimulated surface volcanic activity (making extrusive igneous rocks).

Joggins Rock Textures 15

Ripples from water currents over fine sediments deposited in the Carboniferous Period preserved on the lower surface of boulders from a rock fall

Joggins Rock Textures 15a – Ripples from water movement over fine sediments deposited in the Carboniferous Period, preserved in boulders from a rock fall at Coal Mine Point (also known as Hard Scrabble Point) at Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Ripples preserved from water currents over fine sediments in the Carboniferous Period on the lower surface of boulders from a rock fall

Joggins Rock Textures 15b – Ripples preserved in stone.

Ripples preserved from water currents over fine sediments in the Carboniferous Period on the lower surface of boulders from a rock fall

Joggins Rock Textures 15c – Ripples preserved in stone.

 

Joggins Rock Textures 10

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Natural fracture patterns and subtle colour transitions in rocks at Joggins Fossil Cliffs

Joggins Rock Textures 10 – Natural fracture patterns and subtle colour transitions in rocks at Joggins Fossil Cliffs on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, Canada.