Thames Dock Water Ripples

Thames Dock Water Ripples 1 -11: Rippled river water surface pattern and texture in an abstract artistic image derived by digitally altering the colours of a photograph so that the blue represents the reflected light.

The Hive at Kew

The Hive installation and experience at Kew Gardens, London.

“The Hive is a unique world class installation and experience created by artist Wolfgang Buttress, Simmonds Studio, Stage One and BDP. Pollination is important for our food security – one third of global crop yield is dependent, to some extent, on bees and other pollinators. In highlighting the importance of pollination in our food chain, The Hive poses one of the most pressing questions of our time – how can we protect our pollinators in order to feed our growing population? Illuminated by almost 1,000 LED lights, The Hive represents a vast honey bee hive. It’s linked to one of Kew’s hives and the lights flicker in time to vibrations caused when the bees communicate with one another. Wolfgang was inspired by work of Dr. Martin Benscik at Nottingham Trent University, who has developed technology to monitor the health of bee hives. His research is a prime example of how British science and creativity is helping solve global challenges.”

“What’s the buzz?

Experience four types of vibration caused by honey bees as they communicate inside a hive. Hear these bee “messages” through bone conduction where vibrations pass through bones in your head, instead of through your eardrums. The vibrations have been recorded using accelerometers by Dr. Martin Benscik, reader in physics in Nottingham Trent University.”

Accompanying the 17 metre high structure is a beautiful symphony of orchestral sounds performed in the key of C – the same key that bees buzz in. Together, the sound and light swell and diminish as the energy levels in Kew’s beehive surge.”

Quotes from on-site information noticeboards at The Hive in Kew Gardens

The waters at the mouth of the River Char

Flowing water pattern and texture

The river flowing down to the seashore meets with waves from the sea at Charmouth in Dorset, England. This somewhat abstract image of the natural patterns generated from the meeting of the two forces shows the freshwater continuing to flow smoothly seawards on the left of the channel (top left) while on the right it rebounds from the curving bank with the ripples moving upstream and towards the middle of the channel. The blue and white are reflected sky, and the yellow is reflection from the shingle beach.

Water pattern & texture in Weymouth waves 2

The further you walk along Weymouth pier the deeper and bluer the water – turquoise tinted. In the shallows, the sand on the sea bed makes the water appear more yellow. On this calm day, the water surface was riffled by the wind to produce patterned textures where the transient ridges were delineated by the light they caught.